Real Bunnies Don’t Lay Eggs

Easter Sunday

Today, celebrations of Easter have commenced. Children gather to hunt for plastic shelled eggs filled with candy and families congregate to celebrate the resurrection of their savior, Jesus Christ. An ironic part about Easter celebrations is the involvement of the egg. If bunnies don’t lay eggs and chickens do, how did we get into painting, decorating and hunting for eggs and why are bunnies such an integral part of the holiday?

Trace Dominguez of Discovery.com writes,

According to the University of Florida’s Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, the origin of the celebration — and the origin of the Easter Bunny — can be traced back to 13th-century, pre-Christian Germany, when people worshiped several gods and goddesses. The Teutonic deity Eostra was the goddess of spring and fertility, and feasts were held in her honor on the Vernal Equinox. Her symbol was the rabbit because of the animal’s high reproduction rate.

Not that anyone’s been complaining about  Easter baskets full of bunny chocolates and rabbit shaped gummies– but it’s a tradition that’s not understood by many–yet almost everyone participates. The U.S. isn’t alone in it’s celebrations.  Other countries, including Australia, look at Easter slightly different due to the seasonality. As American’s are celebrating the coming of spring, Australians are the opposite, Erinna Giblin of news.au.com explains,

In Australia, Easter is the point in the year when we realize summer can’t last forever and we need to buckle down before winter. Perhaps even indulge a little more because we know it’s at least half a year before we’ll be seen in our swimming attire.

Cabury Easter EggAmericans are probably feeling a bit of guilt after downing twenty Cabury eggs since swimsuit season is approaching, rather than escaping us here.There have been numerous studies and publications that preach the benefits of dark chocolate, leading consumers to believe it’s much healthier than traditional milk chocolate. Don’t get too excited though, Karen Keller of ABC News sheds light,

So far the only proven positive effects of dark chocolate come from research that studied a daily consumption of 400-600 mg of cocoa flavonoids –  about 10 chocolate bars. Scientists have extrapolated that there are some benefits, though smaller, for, say, just one bar a day, he said.

Shoppers should balance calories and sugar with dark chocolate’s benefits, he said.

“It’s not an all-you-can-eat blank check to eat chocolate,” he said. Markoff gets her low-calorie cocoa flavonoid kick by making cocoa smoothies at home with almond milk, cocoa powder and Stevia, an artificial sweetener, she said.

Ten chocolate bars of dark chocolate is, I’m going to take a short in the dark here, not healthy. Having a few pieces of dark over milk? Probably will make more of a difference mentally than psychically. So go ahead, eat the milk chocolate bunny or egg and remorse later. If you think eggs (the real ones that come from chickens) are selling like hot cakes during this week, you’re right! A little Easter egg trivia: Americans alone will purchase over 180,000,000 eggs for the sole purpose of dying and decorating. If there was ever a time bunnies were happy they don’t lay eggs, let us be sure it’s this week.

If you celebrate Easter today with friends and family, may the best bunny basket win. Around the dinner table, you’ll probably be one of the few to know why the bunny is involved with the holiday. Just remember, real bunnies don’t lay eggs.